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to avoid the fiscal cliff as the government starts taking steps to buy more time before the u.s. hits the debt ceiling. the yen hits a two-year low against the dollar as the new japanese government battles to weaken currency. exports are rising, pushing the nikkei to its strongest gain in 20 years. .shares of toyota are heading higher after the u.s. settled a class action lawsuit. the $1 billion payment is already priced in. okay. welcome to "worldwide exchange." plenty of news to watch out of washington. all of this week, we thought it would be a quiet one. but i won't be inside the beltway if they want to get something done. the u.s. will hit the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling come monday. in a letter to congressional leaders, geithner says treasury will begin taking steps to save the government about $2 billion. geithner says it's harder to predict a time frame because the ongone fiscal cliff talks make it difficult to forecast next year's budget. among the measures treasury will take including suspending state and local government securities and investments in the federal employee pe
. the government is too big and in effective we could take most of the money by decreasing spending. the 11th hour and there are a lot of people who shouldn't be having tax increases if we don't reach a compromise. so those are two different questions and i'm not about to give up the $1.2 trillion. we haven't cut a penny yet. so, that is not something i'm willing to give up. that is the thing. let start there. your book, your work, your speeches, you have identified hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars of waste that the government doesn't need and the country doesn't need and it seems to evaporate. and from what i gather, the debate right now is whether to put off the spending cuts, it is always maniana when it come to spending, sir. and you no as well as i do, taxing the successful earners is not going to solve our problem. >> there is one bright side. if this bill happens, 95% of americans are going to have rates locked in. they are going to have some sernl ti for the future and that is one of the big things that is keeping us from growing now. they don't see the feature. is it a perfect
will officially re-sign from his post on friday. he stressed that italy's next government must avoid backtracking on reforms. elections are due to return in january. sylvia berlusconi met up with cnbc and began by asking him whether he will be running in the upcoming elections. >> translator: yes. obviously, this wasn't my original intention or a desirable option. i had to surrender to reality. and my sense of responsibility convinced me to run again for a premiership. actually, this need come from the polls. a angelino alfamo is capable, but only my participation would have brought back all the voters who supported us in 2008 which represented almost 40% of the total of italian voters. i had to admit what the data was saying as i did in 2004. i feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party that isn't at all social democratic, but has its roots firmly pointed in the communist orthodox party. >> under market and in europe, there is some concern that your return in politics may bring back italy to the latest borrow of 20
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
the government's borrowing ability for another two months or so. and even your cup of coffee wants a deal on the fiscal cliff. baristas at the 120 starbucks in washington, d.c. were encouraged by management to add a shot of bipartisanship to their drink orders and remind customers in our nation's capital to come together. >> wall street is typically quieter this time of year. of course, this last week of 2012 was marked by investor concerns over congress' new year's eve plans and that looming fiscal cliff. so what impact does it have on your money? alison deans is with us, senior adviser at varick asset management. nice to see you. happy new year. do you have two plans for 2012, one that includes the fiscal cliff and one that doesn't? how do you prepare for the new year as an investor? >> pretty much. i mean, the outcome, if there is some type of healthy resolution to the fiscal cliff, even if they defer it for a week or two but come up with some healthy resolution, i think it bodes really well for global markets. if we wind up going into fiscal cliff and the world loses any faith in our
an actual all-time high again. anyway, among the catalysts, a new pro-business government preparing to assume leadership, incoming prime minister shinzo abe. what is it, 50,000 that it has to get to? >> 39,000 i believe is the peak. >> who's counting, right? that's a ways off. >> yeah. far away. >> shinzo abe has been putting pressure on the bank of japan to raise its inflation target in hopes of extricating the country from two decades of deflation. i guess if you just raised the target -- >> that would help. >> okay. >> it doesn't matter what your target is if you can't hit it. >> we found that out here. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to fi
the government, better be a buyer than a seller. compromise is far, far more likely than not, despite last night's shenanigashenanigans. jack in florida, jack? >> caller: i read your book. i enjoyed it very much. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm following a sector rotation strategy with some of my investments. currently in the material sector. and hoping to catch more of the housing uprise. but with the fiscal cliff looming, i was wondering if you would advise more defenseless strategy like consumer staples or something going into the new year. >> what i was thinking i told a friend of mine today conagra reported an amazing number. that's the kind of thing i would think about. nice yield. good growth. i think that's the best idea. why don't we go to brooks in ohio. brooks was here. brooks? >> caller: my question is about abbott, the split, how's it going down and which side are you on? >> good news today. the split will be included in the s&p which is why it was up. abbott is going higher. that's why my travel trust owns it. things seem dysfunctional in washington but even now it's better to be a bu
that in three business days, the summit government is going to run out of borrowing capacity. john, if there were a treasurer in a business who went to their boss and said by the way, three business days, the working capital account dies and as a result, you are not going to make payroll next week, that person would be fired. we get three days notice about hitting the debt ceiling? that seems absurd to me. >> it is not a surprise.rise we have known we were coming to this point and there are two months more -- geithner estimated in that letter that the ways in which the federal government can manage money will give about would months worth of head room, possibly even longer. february or march or -- where we really get to the -- rubber hits the road on that issue. so -- this is not a shock to anybody in government but the publication of this letter and the elevation of the issues in attempt was done in 2011. there was an early moatfication by treasury this was about to happen, trying to get congress to move in a -- interest didn't work then. we will see if it works now. >> defaulting
both on the government side, the reform side, as well as currencies. so i think there's definitely a handful of risks. and you have to kind of -- the play for emerging markets is change. i think when you used to invest as efts, you have to look at the markets differently. i think you have to be more careful. >> all right. let's focus on india. i know you just got back from a long trip where you were evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions graduall
kind of a year are you expecting in 2013? >> i think a good year. i think if the government can just get out of the way, go ahead and tell us what the rules are going to be, whatever they're going to be. make the rules step up to the plate and act responsibly, make some decisions. and then i think the free market system and our business leaders and businesses, small business owners, will make it work. >> are a lot of people in business talking about what's going on with guns and the potential for new gun legislation? i mean, this week we saw sporting goods chain dick's stop selling assault rifles. private equity firm saying it's going to sell its interest in the freedom group all in the wake of the tragedy we're still in mourning over, in connecticut. do you think we'll see real change in gun laws? >> yeah, because i think the president is committed to bringing something forward very quickly. senator feinstein is bringing something up, as well. i don't think there's any business person that i've come across that -- over the last week or so that has not talked about what's happened he
this is a broader issue about western democracy. unless the markets do put governments under pressure, it's not easy to come up with such tough positions and i suspect that is going to be the case. it will be a recurring theme through the year, i suspect. >> and that's what i was going to suggest, this idea that we're going to come up with cliff after cliff after cliff, that maybe we're into a whole year of cliff diving, your expectation, let's say we get through the cliff with a baby deal. we've had still a number of economists come on this set and talk about how we could still be -- maybe not in a recession, but continue to see a slowdown. >> well, the other way i've been trying to think about the past 24 hours, you look at the private sector, there are two sources of great encouragement for the u.s. economy, it seems to me. one is the domestic housing story. and the second is, of course, the remarkable thing going on with energy based around shale, gas and oil. if these two sources of strength persist, you know, is the disappointment about the cliff enough to negate those two things? i suspect th
access to government financed health care at all. if the republicans tomorrow said to you, you know what, you can have all the tax increases you want. we'll raise taxes on people who make $250,000 or more would you then be willing to do serious entitlement reform? >> let me just say that in fact we do means test millionaires right now. there is a serious means testing. >> not by much. a millionaire who gets medicare is nothing. it costs them nothing relative to their net worth, nothing. >> you know what, if the republicans would move, and they haven't yet, you just heard it, no willingness on the part of the republicans to do anything. >> if they did, you would do what? >> we already put $600 billion on the table to get savings out of medicare/medicaid. those are entitlements. >> that's pure cuts to spending that you claim are going to come from waste, fraud, abuse, etc. or just from cutting certain programs. you've got to decrease demand in some parts of medicare and a great way to do it is for people who have the money to spend their own money instead of spending young people's money a
geithner says the government will hit the debt ceiling on monday and he is launching an emergency plan to avert a crisis. amm eamon javers is live. what do we know? >> the president is coming back early, a couple days earlier than his vacation. did a little bit of jogging, working out in the gym over his vacation. now he will be,ing would out on this fiscal cliff. the senate is coming back and the house of representatives is going to have a conference call for all republicans later on today and then yesterday, we saw the secretary of the treasury, tim geithner, announced the $16.4 trillion debt limit is going to be reached by monday, that was a little bit surprising to people who haven't been following this kind of thing and raises the stakes for the fiscal cliff end game because the white house had wanted a debt ceiling deal as part of the overall deal here on the fiscal cliff. republicans have been resisting that by announcing the debt ceiling limit will be held on monday, ratchets up the pressure to include the debt ceiling piece in the final package, whatever that may be, but still
geithner has informed the senate that the united states government will hit its debt ceiling on monday. that is december 31st. now, that doesn't mean that anything happens immediately, because the treasury can take various steps to postpone the moment of reckoning, probably a couple of months. it's still significant. that's an effort to pressure congress. secondly, the house republicans have met, leadership has met, sent a letter to democrats saying the house has acted, now it's up to the senate to act. that's, of course, the m theic-controlled senate which has no intention of taking up that house bill, which would extend all of the bush tax cuts. the president wants to only extent cuts for incomes under $250,000. senate democratic leadership aide tells me there's a 50/50 chance for a mini deal, temporary extension of the tax cuts, before january 1st, but we haven't seen any progress on it yet. president obama is coming back early as you mentioned, from his vacation in hawaii, but a senior white house official tells me they have seen no signs yet of progress toward a deal, so, everybod
fiscal cliff deal. meantime, treasury warns the government will hit its legal borrowing limit by monday. it's thursday, december 27th, 2012 and "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm andrew ross sorkin along with joe kernen. becky continues to have the day off today. our guest host today is bob broska. house speaker john boehner urging the senate to come up with a passable fiscal cliff solution. he's promising to at least consider any bill that the upper chamber produces. senate majority leader harry reid now expected to base any legislation on a bill passed earlier this year to continue tax breaks for households will incomes below $250,000. a senate bill would likely contain an extension of expiring unemployment benefits. and the other big news of the morning, treasury secretary tim geithner unveiling a plan to buy time under the debt ceiling. in a letter to congress, geithner saying that treasury is going to begin taking steps this week to delay hitting the government's 16$16.4 trillion borrowing limit. treasury will tak
tack to the center where i'm going to govern for all of you. are you coming back? >> i'm going to. >> the jacket is coming off, though, right? >> christmas eve and i'm celebrating. as you know, we had the tree going this weekend with the lights on. >> that's so nice. there's one other thing i sought on that thing over the weekend that you brought us that i was going do -- oh,no. did you see mitt romney did not want to run? >> i saw that. that was in the boston globe. that was a great piece worth reading. then he found out how bad things were going on his ipad. >> yeah. but maybe he didn't want to run because there were times i really kind of thought it looked like he didn't want to run. >> yeah, but towards the end, i thought he did. >> he tried hard. thanks. >> okay. >> come over here. >>> in other news, a dock worker strike on the atlantic and coast could be just days away. port operators have been negotiating with the long shoreman association since march. but the two sides are said to be far from closing on a deal that would cover cargo handling at 15 ports, a 9d 0-day extensi
geithner sent a letter to harry reid, the senate majority leader, saying the united states government will hit its statutory debt limit on december 31st. that is the same day that we would go over the fiscal cliff. now the treasury has certain steps they can take to avoid breaching the debt ceiling that will carry the government through february or march, but at the moment in a technical sense treasury secretary geithner is telling the congress we're hitting the debt ceiling at the end of this year which is the part of the, as i mentioned, part of an effort to get congress to step in and act, not only on the fiscal cliff but on the debt ceiling, bill. >> thanks very much for the breaking news. we'll keep monitoring the situation. thanks, john harwood. a look now at financial sector and whether or not you should put your money in the banks. >> 12 months ago there was a lot of buzz about the regionals, but now it's the big banks that have done really, really well. we have the president and ceo at bell rock capital and jeffrey hart. welcome back. >> cassandra, how did we get that wrong,
short a stock. that was a good rule. but somehow the government got talked into abolishing it to make things quicker, it just made things easier for the shorts. a lot of good that did it. the reason a lot of home gamers left the building. the government doesn't seem to care. we established the original rules, the uptick rules, to stop the fomenting panic. something that happened in the great depression. the government seems to think panics are no longer possible. actually, we know they are more prevalent than ever. we have to be careful not to succumb to panics who are orchestrated by short sellers. much easier to panic people in a financial than a regular business that doesn't involve credit. without those protections, the shorts were able to run wild and practically assassinate the stocks during the crash of 2008, until 2009, the bulls were back in control. in 2011, using weapons of mass stock destruction. dealing with a heavily shorted stock in one of the etfs, like the financials, we leashed you have to tread very carefully. you can still find great opportunities in stocks where s
in areas where you essentially don't have governments that have a lot of capacity to protect those embassies. so we're doing a thorough review. not only will we implement the recommendations that were made, but we'll try to do more than that. with respect to who carried it out, that's an ongoing investigation. the fbi has sent individuals to libya repeatedly. we have some very good leads. but this is not something i'm going to be ad at liberty to talk about right now. >> in the politics, in the back and forth of this, do you feel like you let your friend, susan rice, hang out there in this? >> no. first of all, i was very clear that susan has been an outstanding u.n. ambassador for the united states. she appeared on a number of television shows reporting what she and we understood to be the best information at the time. this was a politically motivated attack on her. i mean, of all the people in my national security team, they probably had the least to do with anything that happened in benghazi. why she was targeted individually for the kind of attacks that she was subjected to is
value, at the turn of the 20th century where government spending was 9% of gdp, we're now at 25%. there are some that say, take what we give you and retrofit government to the size of 19% or 20%. do that first. he just wants to shrink what it's grown to, this unwielding federal government that -- don't you think 25% needs to come down? >> well, part of that is cyclical. >> okay. so at 3%? >> 21, 22. >> i would say 22. >> so we have to get it down to 20.5. >> the three big beasts in the budget remain medicare/medicaid, social security and defense. you have to cut almost everything else to zero to get close to balance or to make a big difference. so i think in today's world, given that those entitlements, even if you reform them and cut back back will increase as people like us eventually retire. it seems to me that sizing the government for something around 22 or so is probably doable. but not easy to get to. because you still have to have major cuts and major long titlement reform to get there. >> you see one of the major ceo guys, and i'm not going to quote which one, said yest
with the sequester of last week and spread those cuts across the board to other facets of government as well. not just military and medicare. we really have to wait and see. pressure is on the senate to come up with a product, to take it to the floor, to sell it it to its members where the senate would be comfortable passing something and we really haven't seen anything publicly where the senate might be at. so this is a frustrating for a lot of folks across the country and of course for members here in washington. because we're even kind of away from all of the negotiating and seeing what the senate is even talking about. >> what are you hearing from constituents today? we can see from the stock market's reaction when they thought there was a deal that might be announced at 1:30 when the president makes his remarks, which we will see here on power lunch, we add huge spike in the dow jones industrial average. now that things are cooling off, the mark set giving back a lot of that. so wall street wants a deal. what are your constituents telling you? >> my constituents are concerned about the
stocks like these in earning season? >> all i care about is government pay. if the governor's stinger toward hospitals, i don't want to touch them. there's not enough hospital mergers that can still be done without the government stepping in and saying you know, we've got to block that. with hospital, if the government's on your side, i could be a buyer. if the government's against you, stay away. but stick with cramer. >>> keep up with cramer all day long. follow @jimcramer on twitter and tweet your questions #madtweets.
is not the right solution. we can still count on government to disappoint us each and every time that we need their support, that's a beginning, yet we've had two 10% corrections already this year in stocks, including dividends. they are up close to 14%, and this type of environment, where you're probably going to see another 3% to 5% selloff because of this fiscal announce, fiscal irritation, and when you get that, you should take that money and put it to work. simply because when you look at corporate america, the average company, bill, is generating a 16% to 17% return on equity, record free cash margins and a federal reserve that has the pedal to the metal. what you and i have talked about before repeatedly, $4 in taxes for every dollar in phantom spending cuts. that's fiscal irritation, but the health of corporate america will be what ultimately prevails. >> sounds like david has been reading your book, rick santelli. >> it does. >> big fan of rick. >> this is such a perverse world we live in, okay. let's look as what's happening. down 158 in stocks and that pushed the ten-year yield und
and the storm would be generated by the markets and the loss of confidence in american governance and the american economy, but that's not necessarily going to be the case. we still have a few days left. a white house official told me that there have been no progress over the last couple of days, but an aide to senator harry reid told me there's still a 50/50 chance we get a mini deal that would put off the effects of the cliff at least temporarily and a 50/50 chance of that happening before january 1st. so even though there's a small number of days, sometimes the urgency of a deadline forces lawmakers to overcome differences they can't overcome otherwise. >> remind us, john, a mini deal is composed in the senate but still has to pass through house republicans and boehner or not? >> yes. and the question about the mini deal would be, what we're talking about, just to make clear for our viewers, would be a temporary extension of tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, a couple of months, for example, a temporary turn-off of the sequester, the automatic cuts equally in defense and nond
have reassured the markets, the world, that we could function as a government and make important compromises that we could take shared pain as well as shared sacrifices and all we've done even if we get out of this by december 31, we kicked the can down the road to another day where we'll have to face the harsh realities that you can't always get what you want. we democrats are going to have to accept significant entitlement reform, some of which is needed to preserve the programs we hold dear. republicans are going to have to accept 1$1.2 or three trillion n new revenue. the numbers have to add up, so we can get down to a reasonable percentage of gross national product. >> governor, when you watch these politicians on both sides of the aisle for that matter, take to the cent floor, point fingers, then we have this meeting where nothing has been done, how frustrating is this and is it a symptom of the gridlock that we have in d.c. right now that we can't get a deal done as we teeter on the cliff? >> it is. and it's amazing to me. because if you looked at the exit polls from the e
, and will be for the economy in 2013. finally, did you see this amusing story? u.s. government is put on a negative watch by china? by china? the credit rating agency in china put them on the u.s. government debt on a negative rating at this point. negative watch. this, of course, was supposedly independent rating agency created in china to try to rival moody's and s&p and fitch's. that's getting interesting play out there. their independence, of course, greatly in question. guys, back to you. >> bob, get a lozenge, will you? >> sorry about that. >> let's head to the pits. good morning, rick. >> good morning, melissa lee. well, no surprise we're still hovering in the 170s in the ten-year. but maybe something interesting. you know, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yield
of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >>> the defense industry sure to be affected if we go over the fiscal cliff in just three days because of those automatic spending cuts to the industry. our jane welles has a look at what's ahead for defense in 2013. >> reporter: as the u.s. leaves the fog of war, the defense industry enters the fog of deficits. no industry is more vulnerable to the budget acts, and here are three predictions for 2013. first, the f-35, lockheed's joint strike fighter will be just fine. the most expensive program in history has been hit with cost overruns and production delays and concern from foreign buyers over its price. but lockheed and the pentagon have come to terms to buy another round of the jets for nearly $4 billion. morgan stanley calls the f-35 the single most important investment debate over lockheed stock. second, cash will be king. as defense spendin
cliff, so note to the government. it does matter. >> yeah, but that's, as you say, part of it. laura, what else is going on? it just felt like we were going into a lackluster season here. what happened? >> i mean, there's been some discussion about weather trends as well, but whether or not we go over the fiscal cliff, consumers think next year we'll see higher taxes and lower entitlements. the only place in our space where we see a very significant fiscal cliff hit is aspirational customer, so the step-up customer into low-end tiffany's jewelry, for example, we just don't think they showed up this year. >> even if people, stacy, are going to be hit by higher taxes next year, at least some people are going to be hit by higher taxes next year, a lot of this is psychological, isn't it. you turn on the tv and you're feeling spooked, right? and once we have a deal or resolution, uncertainty taken away, will people unleash their spending? will this be unlocked? >> i think at the high end, yes, there will be some relief, and, you know, to laura's point, we were in tiffany over the weekend,
at the spending cuts, 25% of gdp comes from government spending, historically it's 20 it is. if there's a cut in government spending, where is the lift coming from, consumers, investment? therefore, the u.s. economy, we're on fragile ground right now. >> short term, sarge, this market held hostage minute by minute by the developments out of washington. >> yeah, sure, if we don't see any kind of compromise whatsoever, you'll see this s&p 500 trading in the 1360s next week. i think you'll get a short-term deal, address some of the issues, not really solve anything, kick the can down the road much like they do in europe and get your mild positive reaction going into the jobs data on friday. >> do you think we get a definitive move in this market one way or the other with some announcement out of washington, or is this market just so tired of all of the developments there? what do you think? >> well, there's still a risk-on trend, and if they kick the can down the road or actually come to some kind of compromise, that trend is intact, and you'll see going into the first few months of the year i b
and really the new transitional government -- the government that has been the transitional government starts pulling the levers, we think we'll get some stimulus. it will feed into the global economy. europe is still on the mend, but it is doing what it needs to do. the u.s. has been growing. we've got housing, we've got automobiles. both have put in good numbers and we would expect that our economy will be able to weather the rockiness near term and benefit from an agreement on this fiscal cliff. >> steve weiss quickly. >> john, how do you see it playing out? we've seen a lot of ends being front end loaded only to fall off and maintain the back end. with everything that's going on in terms of spending, cutting back from europe and from u.s. standpoint. how do you see it playing out next year in terms of the market action? >> in terms of the market action, what we would expect, the first quarter a lot is going to depend on what happens with the fiscal cliff. as i said before, if we move into a recession, you're not going to get a 1585 target or 2 $108 in earnings. we're not expecting the po
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by federal law. but thousands of companies and countless municipal governments and police departments refuse to hire smokers, and some require affidavits and even use lie detector tests to enforce the policy. bosses like howard weyers will not pay for what they see as other people's bad habits. >> the biggest frustration in the workplace is the cost of healthcare. medical plans weren't established to pay for unhealthy lifestyles. >> how much does it cost you? how much of the smokers that you once employed here cost you? >> i never really measured them. >> so it may not have cost you a dime? >> well, it may not, but i don't know what's gonna happen five years from now with that person who's smoking. that's what i don't want to wait for. >> this former college football coach works out five times a week and wants his employees to share his values. at weyco, howard rules. >> i've set the policy. i'm not gonna bend from the policy. >> but it strikes me as a kind of intolerant attitude to the habits, foibles, eccentricities of other people. >> right. i would say i'm intolerable. >> [laughing] into
cleaner and company, but he still needed more. >> i went to venture capitalists and the government and all sorts of people, and they all rejected me, so, in the end, i managed to persuade a bank to lend me a million pounds. >> so the big companies weren't willing to take the risk, but you were willing to risk everything? >> yeah. >> how afraid were you of failing? >> well, i was terrified, but, um, i wanted to do it. i believed in it. my friends thought i was mad. i mean, everybody thought i was mad. >> undaunted, he founded his namesake company from his shed in 1992. the next year, his first machine, the dc01, rolled off the production line, and 18 months later, the roughly $300 machine was the best-selling vacuum in the u.k. -- a crazy idea dyson wisely protected. >> you've got to have a patent, 'cause there's no point in going through all that agony and spending all that money if you can't stop other people making it. >> 43 million vacuums later, dyson now employs nearly 4,000 people in about 60 offices worldwide, including this state-of-the-art global headquarters in england, where eve
years, up 56%. iron ore prices. that's a real lead on demand. and especially as the chinese government makes all these nods toward urbanization plans and the need to update and invest in infrastructure. these are the areas where you want to be. >> yeah. also ties into what clearly will be one of the bigger stories of next year. and that is central banking wars. japan is right next door, dan. >> this is a story that is getting not as much play as it should. but the dispute going on between china and japan is quite stark right now. and i see on the interweb that is a chinese think tank has come out and said conflict between japan and china is inevitable in 2013 and 2014. this is a real debate. simultaneously lost in the debate over the election of abe and his push for abe-nomics is the fact that this is a very nationalistic individual. his first term in '06 was characterized by a lot of nationalistic policies. we'll see how that plays out with respect to the ongoing debate. >> we have to take a break here. the markets are looking for some direction after fiscal cliff negotiations stall.
, not by taxing and not going about it the way the government is talking about it. the far and away, the number one place it avoid are long-term interest rates sensitive bonds in the united states. if there was ever an investment more obvious to avoid, i don't know what it is. stay way from government bonds that mature more than five years out and your 401(k) plans, get out of all of your bond funds, equities will rise in 2013. even though the economy is in a terrible position, stocks will rise, bonds will fall in value. stay away from bonds. >> all right, we will watch that. bob, jump in and tell us about the action on the street. down 51 point at close. was that the low, bob? >> no, not quite. we were just a little bit lower than -- take a look the a dow and i will show you. by the way, bonds collapse was the big call of 2012, and spectacularly wrong for a lot of people. but that's still on for a lot of people. there you see, just off of the lows there. maybe about 60-something is the bottom on the dow jones investment average. trading shortened by the holiday. material stocks led the way and
significant increases in their ratings. >> look at young brands, up 1.5%. the chinese government has cleared chicken samples from various kfc restaurants. some concerns last week because some of the chicken that they procured from various farms were found to have high levels of antibiotics. 32 samples passed for antibiotics and steroids. some major issues for yum brands, 44% of its revenues come from china. getting the clearance at this point, very good news, and we're seeing the stock respond accordingly. bob pisani is here on the floor with more. >> good morning. merry christmas, everybody. over the weekend, is there a plan c on the fiscal cliff floating around. the only offer that's really on the table, and i hate to get so simplist simplistic, was the president's offer. he mentioned it at the press conference late friday afternoon, and that's raise taxes on the top 2%. that's basically the offer on the table. there's a lot of people trying to throw in a lot of spending cuts into a so-called plan c, raise the medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67. that's really an afterthought going in r
them and the government knew where they were because they were all registered were required to hand them in even the target shooting olympic team was not allowed to keep guns in the country and they had to practice and keep their guns abroad, but nonetheless, within the decade of guns being withdrawn from these people gun crime with handguns actually doubled and guns are really are awash on the streets and there's a fair amount of street crime using handguns which there hadn't been much of before, and it's beyond which was something that traditionally they never were. so it hasn't worked and what it has done and it's taken the guns away from the law-abiding people that might have used them to protect themselves or to do something else with legitimately. >> what do you say to people who look at united states and say, wow! random mass murderers -- i heard it today. random mass murders in the united states where some whacko killed a bunch of people he doesn't know seems to happen every six months in the united states and it doesn't happen as often in other places. are they wrong about
to cost the government more. better to have them in medicare where the administration costs are 4% instead of 20%. so, that's really an awful idea. the idea of means testing, it already is means tested. if you want means tested a little bit more, be my guest, but means testing medicare really doesn't save you very much money. that's silliness. and i'm generally against means testing many programs anyway because i think for programs like this, which are really safety net programs, everybody needs to be in them to have the political impetus. and finally, medicare is the only really efficient universal health care program that we have in the country. why you want to kick people out of it is beyond me. >> i would really like to ask you, how you feel about being an american, someone who obviously has been in a very prominent leadership position here. we've spoken with many very prominent people, such as yourself, like ed rendell who said, what has been going on in congress right now, going right down to the wire, means that we've become an embarrassment, the nation has become an embarrassment.
russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there should be consequences when it comes to getting visas. vladimir mute indecided to lash out to the united states by pointing a figurative rifle at the head of russia's orphans. >> we improve russia's trade relation with us, officially and then he gets upset because buried within there is a little clause that says, as you point out, the worst human rights violators should have trouble getting into the united states. how far should we go, throw, right? i brought this up last night and i'll bring it up again with you. in the united states we believe that people all over the world have certain rights regardless of geography, regardless of ethnicity, regardless of religion. they are inalienable and it is unfathomable to us that there are parts of the world where they don't believe that. it's amazing, but true. how far do we go in
has, they won't have anymore, and they won't have the government assistance programs to rely on. may not have the same effect we saw in the last recession. >> the ultimate consumer discretionary stocks, it occurs to me, dana, would be the luxury retailers like a tiffany which have suffered here recently. they in the past have been immune to a lot of vagaries of the consumer and the economy, but that hasn't been the case this time around. what happened? >> i think tiffany's a little bit different than some of the other luxury goods company. tiffany overall is working on its product, silver business which is a high margin category. didn't have enough novelty and newness in it and hopefully that's something they can fix for next year. >> wasn't just me then? >> not just you. >> exactly. >> i noticed that, yeah. >> dana on that point, the companies for stocks like tiffany's, what about aptitude in places like china in. >> overall when we see what's happening in china, so many new brands emerged in china, new companies on the luxury good fronts, and you've had the big conglomerates vogue
is regulated by the government as a food product, so the levels of toxins and carcinogens are kept to a bare minimum. that's why doctors in sweden recommend snus to people who simply can't stop smoking even though it's clearly an addictive substance. they're following a controversial medical practice called harm reduction. and groups like the royal college of physicians are pushing it for smokers, saying that less hazardous products like snus "can save millions of lives." >> at this point in time, i cannot say that these products are safer. >> but in the u.s., health officials like karla sneegas don't like the idea of harm reduction, where you use another tobacco product to fight smoking. she runs the anti-tobacco program for the state of indiana. >> i think that these products are going to end up leading to dual use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. and we have no idea whatsoever what is the outcome, what's the health impact, of someone not quitting and using both products. >> in other words, you're saying that if they do that, it could end up being more harmful. >> it could end
and more money will be spent by governments and people and during the hour we're taping the show, another thousand people are turning 65. we like the way the stocks are set up technically, almost all out of breakout resistance levels. on the phrfamilia pharma sidsid- >> i will break in with breaking news. we are not taping. >> we're taping and going live to tape. >> so we're not going to edit anything i just said? >> no. it's not going on tape anywhere. >> let's get back -- >> welcome back to live television. >> the logistics not withstanding. >> each of you think a different sector of the market will be the leadership group of 2013. >> interesting no one said energy that over the last couple years was always the sector everyone pointed to. >> let me say something about the three picks, strong cases made. the reason why i wouldn't take those trades and why i'm going for health care, on industrials, you need a huge pickup in the global economy for that group to perform. i don't see where it's coming from. midway through the year, i might changes my tune. on financials, it almost never happ
the government on hiatus in terms of spending money but we've always gotten through it. to me that is not the seminole issue. if that is i'm happy to be on the other side of the trade. >> i wasn't saying it is an actual issue. i said it was surprised at the degree to which corporate leaders are saying that that is a big deal. in other words to me to -- >> that pales in every interview i've heard, on cnbc, that paels in comparison. it is an after thought relative to getting the budget situation and tax situation set. that has only come on as an issue recently. you talk about pent up demand for the market over the last month. pent up demand has been in corporations spending their 2 trillion in cash over the last year in advance of settling this situation not the debt ceiling. >> let me also say mike before we let you go just to revisit the to revisit the trade you brought last week which was a winner tan that was long tlt, going long treasuries, that still work for you? >> well it still works i think as long as the process gets dragged out. what the bond market is not going to d
who want to govern, who want to increase the debt creel egg, not flirt with a downgrade and default and you're going have the hard line conservatives saying, i don't care, i think it's bogus, the debt ceiling going past it, it doesn't matter. the democrfight is going to be . >> walk us through the political calculus in terms of the stumbling block at this point when it comes to the sequester. democrats want to extend that for a year. if we go over the cliff technically, though, does that strengthen the democrats' hand? what happens? how does the political equation change? >> it changes it a lot. because democrats, you know, wake up tomorrow with tax rates having reverted across the board to the clinton era levels. they've gone up on everybody, not just the $450,000 that republicans are now willing to agree to. so, the question is, for democrats, what's the incentive for them to then accept a whole lot of spending cuts if they've already gotten their tax increases. i think republicans want to see a deal get done tonight because their hand is weakened tomorrow when tax rates have all
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